Thursday, 21 November 2019

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Healthy Modern Chinese Food


I am compiling a list of healthy modern Chinese cooking that incorporates nutritious ingredients normally not used in Chinese cooking such as oats, quinoa, millet, kale, flax seeds, etc. But I am also including some of more common ingredients used in Chinese cooking such as ginger as well. I have tested the recipes in our own kitchen and I am documenting it for the ease of access for myself. I will come back to update it, whenever there is a new addition.


Coat meat with ground oats and ground flax seeds for frying







Easy Healthy Chinese Braised Pork (红烧肉 Hong Shao Rou)



Chinese Fish Congee Made with Quinoa


Chinese Steamed Cod Fish


Chinese Steamed Salmon


Chinese Ginger Chicken Soup


Chinese Black Bean Soup


Chinese Herbal Imperial Chicken


Chinese Dumplings made with buckwheat


Chinese Egg Dumplings


Chinese Egg Fried Rice

Add 1-2 tea spoons of ground flax seeds at the end of frying your friend rice. Stir and fry the rice until fragrant. You will find that adding ground flax seeds gives the same effect of a fried rice fragrant, just like those from Chinese restaurants in Singapore, where they fried the rice under big fire. 

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Chinese Brown Rice & Quinoa Minced Pork Porridge


Serves 4

Ingredients:

1. 1 cup brown rice
2. 1 cup quinoa
3. 2 litres water
4. 250 g minced pork marinaded with 2 TBS soy sauce and 2 TBS sesame oil
5. A handful of lettuce sliced thin
6. 1 stalk spring onions chopped for garnish
7. Salt & pepper to taste
8. Garlic oil (optional)
9. 1 egg (optional)

Directions:

1. In a pot, rinse brown rice and quinoa, add 2 litres of water and bring to boil.

2. Simmer under low heat (no. 2.5 on my stove) for one hour.

3. Add minced pork, stir and mix well and simmer for another hour or until it is cooked and reaches the consistency that you desire. If you wish it to be softer, cook longer.

4. Add salt and pepper to taste.

5. Crack an egg into a serving bowl (optional).

6. Add porridge and garnish with spring onion, lettuce, garlic oil and serve.

Nutritional Value:

Brown rice as an excellent source of manganese, and a good source of selenium, phosphorus, copper, magnesium, and niacin (vitamin B3).

Quinoa is a highly nutritious food. Quinoa has been rated by the WHO as possessing protein of a quality similar to milk. It has been classified as a supercrop by the United Nations on account of its nutritional value and high protein content. Not only is quinoa high in protein, but the protein it supplies is complete protein, meaning that it includes all nine essential amino acids. The protein quality and quantity in quinoa seed is often superior to those of more common cereal grains. Quinoa is especially well-endowed with the amino acid lysine, which is essential for tissue growth and repair. Quinoa is higher in lysine than wheat. Quinoa grain has a lower sodium content and is higher in calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, manganese, and zinc than wheat, barley, or corn. Because quinoa is a very good source of manganese as well as a good source of magnesium, iron, copper and phosphorus, this "grain" may be especially valuable for persons with migraine headaches, diabetes and atherosclerosis.

Quinoa is a very good source of manganese and a good source of copper, two minerals that serve as cofactors for the superoxide dismutase enzyme. Superoxide dismutase is an antioxidant that helps to protect the mitochondria from oxidative damage created during energy production as well as guard other cells, such as red blood cells, from injury caused by free radicals.

Quinoa also contains vitamins B6, Niacin and Thiamin. Quinoa is lower in carbohydrates than most other grains, but an excellent source of complex carbohydrates and cooks in about half the time of regular rice. Quinoa is low in fat.

Additional Information:

This porridge tastes great, and at the same time is healthier and more nutritious version, but is equally delicious as traditional Chinese minced pork porridge.

Our Little FECS having a bowl of warm brown rice & quinoa porridge after returning home from his Scouts camp.


Tuesday, 19 November 2019

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Montessori Activity: Tracing Chinese Character with Stamps


Age: From 3.5 years old

Duration: 30 minutes

Objectives:

1. To provide a fun way to teach writing Chinese characters
2. To train the child's fine motor skills

Materials:

1. 1 stamp and stamp pad
2. 1 Chinese Character
3. 1 toy horse (optional)
4. 1 tray

Directions:

1. Demonstrate to your child how to trace the Chinese character using stamp, taking care to show her the correct sequence of strokes.
2. As you trace, read the Chinese character clearly to your child.
3. Invite your child to try.
4. As her to say out loud the Chinese character that she is tracing.

Additional Information:

I tried this activity with C today 19 November 2019 (3Y6M3D). I use this activity to revise the Chinese character "horse" that she learned during the Chinese enrichment class last Sunday. She preferred other tracing activities better, especially the one with gel crayon. She wasn't so fond of tracing out Chinese character by stamping. She had fun stamping all over the paper instead, which was also fine :-)




19 November 2019 (3Y6M3D)

Monday, 18 November 2019

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Montessori Activity: Tracing Chinese Character with Stickers


Age: From 3.5 years old

Objectives:

1. To provide a fun way to teach writing Chinese characters

2. To train the child's fine motor skills

Materials:

1. 1 sheet of stickers

2. 1 Chinese Character written on a piece of paper

3. 1 tray

Directions:

1. Demonstrate to your child how to trace the Chinese character by pasting the stickers.

2. As you paste the stickers, say the stroke of the Chinese character clearly to your child.

3. Invite your child to try.

4. As her to say out loud the stroke of the Chinese character that she is tracing.

Additional Information:

C tried this today 18 November 2019 (3Y6M2D) and really enjoyed it. I think it also helped her to learn to recognize the Chinese character for cow well.


18 Nov 2019 (3Y6M2D)





Friday, 15 November 2019

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Montessori Activity: Tracing Chinese Character with Play Dough


Age: From 3.5 years old

Duration: 30 minutes

Objectives:

1. To provide a fun way to teach writing Chinese characters
2. To train the child's fine motor skills

Materials:

1. 1 container of play dough
2. 1 Chinese Character
3. 1 tray

Directions:

1. Demonstrate to your child how to trace the Chinese character using play dough, taking care to show her the correct sequence of strokes.
2. As you trace, read the Chinese character clearly to your child.
3. Invite your child to try.
4. As her to say out loud the Chinese character that she is tracing.

Additional Information:

I tried this activity with C today 15 November 2019 (3Y5M30D). I use this activity to revise the Chinese character "lamb" that she learned during the Chinese enrichment class last Sunday. She could remember the character, and was able to say it out loud. She enjoyed this activity very much, more than J did at this age. She was able to concentrate and play much longer than J. It could be development difference between boy and girl. If you wish to make your own play dough, you can follow this recipe:

Ingredients:

- 2 cups flour
- 1 cup water cup hot water
- 1 TBS cooking oil
- 1 cup salt
- a couple drops of food colouring (optional)

Directions:

1. Dissolve the salt in the water first to reduce the lumpiness due to undissolved salt in the dough later on.

2. Mix together and knead into a dough.

3. Divide it into 4 doughs, dip a hole and add food colouring to it (make sure to wear gloves to prevent staining. Then knead and blend well.


15 November 2019 (3Y5M30D)















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